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Religious Education Policy

Eastling Primary School

RE Policy

Date: January 2020

Review Date: January 2021

Purpose

Religious Education is a compulsory subject and forms part of the National Curriculum to which every pupil should have access. It can provide the foundation for many people’s lives and promote acceptance and understanding of other beliefs. Through the teaching of RE we aim to promote the spiritual, moral and cultural development of all pupils. The RE syllabus that we are currently following at Eastling Primary school is the ‘Kent Agreed Syllabus for Religious Education 2017-2022’. At Eastling Primary School, we enable children to develop a sound knowledge for the following major religions; Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Judaism, as well as Humanists who follow no religion. Both religious and non-religious world views are studied. Children reflect on what it means to have a faith and to develop their own spiritual knowledge and understanding. We help children learn from religions as well as about religions.

 

Aims

Religious Education is an important part of the school curriculum and is taught relevant to the child’s stage of development and experience. The principal aim of RE in the Kent syllabus is

‘To engage pupils in systematic enquiry into significant human questions which religion and worldviews address, so that they can develop the understanding and skills needed to appreciate and appraise varied responses to these questions, as well as develop responses of their own’.

This should ensure that pupils:

  1. Know about and understand a range of religions and worldviews.
  2. Express ideas and insights about the nature, significance and impact of religions and worldviews.
  3. Gain and deploy the skills needed to engage seriously with religions and worldviews.

The overall aims should enable pupils to:

  • Develop conceptual understanding of religion, religious beliefs and practices – in order that they can begin to engage in informed reflection and discussion about religions and religion.
  • Develop an informed appreciation of religions – in order that they can explore religions with openness, interest and enjoyment.
  • Value religious and cultural diversity – in order to enhance their social and cultural development and to contribute to a more just and civil society.
  • Create meaning from their knowledge and understanding of religions– in order to enhance their spiritual and moral development.
  • Develop an awareness of the richness of religions and their contributions to society and culture – in order that they can make increasingly mature judgements about the world in which they live.
  • Recognise commonality and difference within and between religions – in order to develop respect, openness and curiosity.
  • Develop a sensitive understanding of the significance of religious commitment and practice in the lives of individuals – in order that they might develop respect for individuals and their right to hold beliefs that are different from their own.

 

Objectives

  • Children will learn about religions and religion – to ensure that religious education provides breadth and balance in both content and approaches to learning so that they become religiously literate.
  • Children will learn from religions and religion – to ensure that they are able to: a) create meaning, find relevance and develop personally from their engagement with religious education;

b) explore human experience and questions by addressing values, ultimate questions and fundamental concerns about themselves and the world in which they live.

  • We provide opportunities for children of all abilities to develop their skills and knowledge in each unit and ensure the planned progression built into the syllabus offers the children an increasing challenge as they move through the school. KS2 builds upon KS1, KS1 builds upon the Foundation Stage. In addition, certain skills and attitudes are encouraged e.g. learning to respect the skills of others, asking questions and listening to others, personal reflection on life and its values.
  • Children with Special Educational Needs will access the R.E. study units at their own level by beginning with where the children are and developing their skills, knowledge and understanding at a rate that is challenging but appropriate for the individual child.
  • The teaching and learning strategies within RE lessons will vary through reading and writing opportunities linked to the English curriculum as well having the opportunity to be creative in its broadest sense, including: thinking; doing; imagining; responding; speaking and listening; problem solving; as well as the creative and expressive arts.
  • Teachers should ensure that their children have opportunities to encounter religions, faith and commitment through visits and visitors.
  • Gifted and talented pupils will be offered differentiated opportunities, where appropriate, to extend their learning in order to reach their true potential.
  • The children may use ICT to research and present their work. This will require discernment in their use of sources. Virtual tours of places of worship are used where actual visits are not possible.

 

The RE Curriculum

At Eastling Primary School, the religious education curriculum forms an important part of our school’s spiritual, moral and social teaching. It also promotes education for citizenship. Our school RE curriculum follows the Kent Agreed Syllabus for Religious Education 2017-2022. The curriculum is written to reflect progressive key questions per year group.

The curriculum is split into 3 distinct areas of learning:

Believing – children will learn about religious beliefs, teachings, sources of religion, develop questions about meaning, purpose and truth.

Expressing – children will learn about religious and spiritual forms of expression and develop questions regarding identity and diversity

Living – Children will learn about religious practices and ways of living and develop questions about values and commitments.

 

Time spent on R.E:

FS & KS1: 36 hours (1 hour per week)

KS2: 45 hours (1.25 hours per week)

Teaching and Learning

We base our teaching and learning style in RE on the key principle that good teaching in RE allows children both to learn about religious traditions and to reflect on what the religious ideas and concepts mean to them. Our teaching enables children to extend their own sense of values and promotes their spiritual growth and development. We encourage children to think about their own views and values in relation to the themes and topics studied in the RE curriculum. Our teaching and learning styles in RE enable children to build on their own experiences and extend their knowledge and understanding of religious traditions.

We use their experiences at religious festivals such as Easter, Diwali, Passover etc. to develop their religious thinking. We organise visits to local places of worship and invite representatives of local religious groups to come into school and talk to the children.

Children carry out research into religious topics. They study particular religious faiths and also compare the religious views of different faith groups on topics such as rites of passage or festivals. Children discuss religious and moral issues using computers and working individually or in groups. Sometimes they prepare presentations and share these with other members of the school in assemblies. We recognise the fact that all classes in our school have children of widely differing abilities, and so we provide suitable learning opportunities for all children by matching the challenge of the task to the ability of the child.

 

The Foundation Stage

It is important in the foundation stage to give children a broad, play based experience of RE in a range of contexts, including outdoor play. Early years learning environments should feature RE scenarios based on experience in the real world, such as in role play. We teach RE to all children in the school, including those in the reception class. In reception class, RE is an integral part of the topic work covered during the year. As the reception class is part of the Foundation Stage Curriculum, we relate the RE aspects of the children's work to the objectives set out in the Early Learning Goals which underpin the curriculum planning for children aged three to five.

 

Personal, social and health education (PSHE) and citizenship

Through our religious education lessons, we teach the children about the values and moral beliefs that underpin individual choices of behaviour. So, for example, we contribute to the discussion of topics such as smoking, drugs (Key stage 2) and health education. We also promote the values and attitudes required for citizenship in a democracy by teaching respect for others and the need for personal responsibility. In general, by promoting tolerance and understanding of other people, we enable children to appreciate what it means to be positive members of our pluralistic society. We also teach and promote British Values through religious education. At Eastling, these are reinforced in the following ways: democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty, mutual respect and tolerance.

 

Spiritual, moral, social and cultural development

Through teaching religious education in our school, we provide opportunities for spiritual development. Children consider and respond to questions concerning the meaning and purpose of life. We help them to recognise the difference between right and wrong through the study of moral and ethical questions. We enhance their social development by helping them to build a sense of identity in a multicultural society. Children explore issues of religious faith and values and, in so doing, they develop their knowledge and understanding of the cultural context of their own lives.

 

Pupils with SEN (see our SEN Policy)

We believe that all children have the right to access the RE curriculum. In order to ensure that children with special educational needs achieve to the best of their ability, it may be necessary to adapt the delivery of the curriculum for some pupils. We teach the RE curriculum to all children, whatever their ability. Through the teaching of RE we provide learning opportunities that enable all pupils to make progress. We do this by setting suitable learning challenges and responding to each child’s different needs. Where appropriate we may support SEN children in small groups or on a one to one basis.

 

Assessment

Assessing RE is an integral part of teaching and learning and central to good practice. It should be process orientated reviewing the way that techniques and skills are applied purposefully by pupils to demonstrate their knowledge and understanding and skills that they have developed during a particular unit. As assessment is part of the learning process it is essential that pupils are closely involved. Assessment can be broken down into;

Formative assessments are carried out during and following short focused tasks and activities. They provide pupils and teaching staff the opportunity to reflect on their learning in the context of the agreed success criteria. This feeds into planning for the next lesson or activity.

Summative assessment should review pupils' capability and provide a best fit level. Use of independent open ended tasks, provide opportunities for pupils to demonstrate capability in relation to the term’s work. There should be an opportunity for pupil review and identification of next steps. Summative assessment should be recorded for all pupils showing whether the pupils have met, exceeded or not achieved the learning objectives.

Teachers will use assessments to form a judgement as to whether each child has reached the targets for each key question in their year group. Evidence of work will be highlighted in children’s books, on photographs, videos and notes on discussions with children etc. This will demonstrate achievement of objectives.

 

Monitoring and review

Monitoring will support the self-evaluation process identifying areas of strength as well as those for development. The RE Lead is responsible for the monitoring of this policy. Areas for development will be incorporated into the School Improvement Plan as necessary.

Through monitoring the coordinator will:

• Ensure that there is clear progression throughout the school

• Analyse assessment data and pupil progress

• Identify any training needs and offer extra support and guidance to staff when it is appropriate

• Ensure that there are suitable resources to help with the teaching and learning of RE

 

Withdrawal from RE Learning

Parents may request that their child is withdrawn from R.E. Where parents are wishing to exercise this right, the Governing Body would first suggest that the parents first meet with the Headteacher to discuss their concerns. If the matter cannot be resolved, parents need to apply to the Governing Body in writing to withdraw their child from RE lessons. The Governing body will make arrangements with the Headteacher for the child(ren) to be supervised or engaged in another activity during this time. We are mindful that everyone holds different beliefs and this is taken into consideration at Eastling Primary School and in RE lessons.

Purpose

Religious Education is a compulsory subject and forms part of the National Curriculum to which every pupil should have access. It can provide the foundation for many people’s lives and promote acceptance and understanding of other beliefs. Through the teaching of RE we aim to promote the spiritual, moral and cultural development of all pupils. The RE syllabus that we are currently following at Eastling Primary school is the ‘Kent Agreed Syllabus for Religious Education 2017-2022’. At Eastling Primary School, we enable children to develop a sound knowledge for the following major religions; Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Judaism, as well as Humanists who follow no religion. Both religious and non-religious world views are studied. Children reflect on what it means to have a faith and to develop their own spiritual knowledge and understanding. We help children learn from religions as well as about religions.

 

Aims

Religious Education is an important part of the school curriculum and is taught relevant to the child’s stage of development and experience. The principal aim of RE in the Kent syllabus is

‘To engage pupils in systematic enquiry into significant human questions which religion and worldviews address, so that they can develop the understanding and skills needed to appreciate and appraise varied responses to these questions, as well as develop responses of their own’.

This should ensure that pupils:

  1. Know about and understand a range of religions and worldviews.
  2. Express ideas and insights about the nature, significance and impact of religions and worldviews.
  3. Gain and deploy the skills needed to engage seriously with religions and worldviews.

The overall aims should enable pupils to:

  • Develop conceptual understanding of religion, religious beliefs and practices – in order that they can begin to engage in informed reflection and discussion about religions and religion.
  • Develop an informed appreciation of religions – in order that they can explore religions with openness, interest and enjoyment.
  • Value religious and cultural diversity – in order to enhance their social and cultural development and to contribute to a more just and civil society.
  • Create meaning from their knowledge and understanding of religions– in order to enhance their spiritual and moral development.
  • Develop an awareness of the richness of religions and their contributions to society and culture – in order that they can make increasingly mature judgements about the world in which they live.
  • Recognise commonality and difference within and between religions – in order to develop respect, openness and curiosity.
  • Develop a sensitive understanding of the significance of religious commitment and practice in the lives of individuals – in order that they might develop respect for individuals and their right to hold beliefs that are different from their own.

 

Objectives

  • Children will learn about religions and religion – to ensure that religious education provides breadth and balance in both content and approaches to learning so that they become religiously literate.
  • Children will learn from religions and religion – to ensure that they are able to: a) create meaning, find relevance and develop personally from their engagement with religious education;

b) explore human experience and questions by addressing values, ultimate questions and fundamental concerns about themselves and the world in which they live.

  • We provide opportunities for children of all abilities to develop their skills and knowledge in each unit and ensure the planned progression built into the syllabus offers the children an increasing challenge as they move through the school. KS2 builds upon KS1, KS1 builds upon the Foundation Stage. In addition, certain skills and attitudes are encouraged e.g. learning to respect the skills of others, asking questions and listening to others, personal reflection on life and its values.
  • Children with Special Educational Needs will access the R.E. study units at their own level by beginning with where the children are and developing their skills, knowledge and understanding at a rate that is challenging but appropriate for the individual child.
  • The teaching and learning strategies within RE lessons will vary through reading and writing opportunities linked to the English curriculum as well having the opportunity to be creative in its broadest sense, including: thinking; doing; imagining; responding; speaking and listening; problem solving; as well as the creative and expressive arts.
  • Teachers should ensure that their children have opportunities to encounter religions, faith and commitment through visits and visitors.
  • Gifted and talented pupils will be offered differentiated opportunities, where appropriate, to extend their learning in order to reach their true potential.
  • The children may use ICT to research and present their work. This will require discernment in their use of sources. Virtual tours of places of worship are used where actual visits are not possible.

 

The RE Curriculum

At Eastling Primary School, the religious education curriculum forms an important part of our school’s spiritual, moral and social teaching. It also promotes education for citizenship. Our school RE curriculum follows the Kent Agreed Syllabus for Religious Education 2017-2022. The curriculum is written to reflect progressive key questions per year group.

The curriculum is split into 3 distinct areas of learning:

Believing – children will learn about religious beliefs, teachings, sources of religion, develop questions about meaning, purpose and truth.

Expressing – children will learn about religious and spiritual forms of expression and develop questions regarding identity and diversity

Living – Children will learn about religious practices and ways of living and develop questions about values and commitments.

 

Time spent on R.E:

FS & KS1: 36 hours (1 hour per week)

KS2: 45 hours (1.25 hours per week)

Teaching and Learning

We base our teaching and learning style in RE on the key principle that good teaching in RE allows children both to learn about religious traditions and to reflect on what the religious ideas and concepts mean to them. Our teaching enables children to extend their own sense of values and promotes their spiritual growth and development. We encourage children to think about their own views and values in relation to the themes and topics studied in the RE curriculum. Our teaching and learning styles in RE enable children to build on their own experiences and extend their knowledge and understanding of religious traditions.

We use their experiences at religious festivals such as Easter, Diwali, Passover etc. to develop their religious thinking. We organise visits to local places of worship and invite representatives of local religious groups to come into school and talk to the children.

Children carry out research into religious topics. They study particular religious faiths and also compare the religious views of different faith groups on topics such as rites of passage or festivals. Children discuss religious and moral issues using computers and working individually or in groups. Sometimes they prepare presentations and share these with other members of the school in assemblies. We recognise the fact that all classes in our school have children of widely differing abilities, and so we provide suitable learning opportunities for all children by matching the challenge of the task to the ability of the child.

 

The Foundation Stage

It is important in the foundation stage to give children a broad, play based experience of RE in a range of contexts, including outdoor play. Early years learning environments should feature RE scenarios based on experience in the real world, such as in role play. We teach RE to all children in the school, including those in the reception class. In reception class, RE is an integral part of the topic work covered during the year. As the reception class is part of the Foundation Stage Curriculum, we relate the RE aspects of the children's work to the objectives set out in the Early Learning Goals which underpin the curriculum planning for children aged three to five.

 

Personal, social and health education (PSHE) and citizenship

Through our religious education lessons, we teach the children about the values and moral beliefs that underpin individual choices of behaviour. So, for example, we contribute to the discussion of topics such as smoking, drugs (Key stage 2) and health education. We also promote the values and attitudes required for citizenship in a democracy by teaching respect for others and the need for personal responsibility. In general, by promoting tolerance and understanding of other people, we enable children to appreciate what it means to be positive members of our pluralistic society. We also teach and promote British Values through religious education. At Eastling, these are reinforced in the following ways: democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty, mutual respect and tolerance.

 

Spiritual, moral, social and cultural development

Through teaching religious education in our school, we provide opportunities for spiritual development. Children consider and respond to questions concerning the meaning and purpose of life. We help them to recognise the difference between right and wrong through the study of moral and ethical questions. We enhance their social development by helping them to build a sense of identity in a multicultural society. Children explore issues of religious faith and values and, in so doing, they develop their knowledge and understanding of the cultural context of their own lives.

 

Pupils with SEN (see our SEN Policy)

We believe that all children have the right to access the RE curriculum. In order to ensure that children with special educational needs achieve to the best of their ability, it may be necessary to adapt the delivery of the curriculum for some pupils. We teach the RE curriculum to all children, whatever their ability. Through the teaching of RE we provide learning opportunities that enable all pupils to make progress. We do this by setting suitable learning challenges and responding to each child’s different needs. Where appropriate we may support SEN children in small groups or on a one to one basis.

 

Assessment

Assessing RE is an integral part of teaching and learning and central to good practice. It should be process orientated reviewing the way that techniques and skills are applied purposefully by pupils to demonstrate their knowledge and understanding and skills that they have developed during a particular unit. As assessment is part of the learning process it is essential that pupils are closely involved. Assessment can be broken down into;

Formative assessments are carried out during and following short focused tasks and activities. They provide pupils and teaching staff the opportunity to reflect on their learning in the context of the agreed success criteria. This feeds into planning for the next lesson or activity.

Summative assessment should review pupils' capability and provide a best fit level. Use of independent open ended tasks, provide opportunities for pupils to demonstrate capability in relation to the term’s work. There should be an opportunity for pupil review and identification of next steps. Summative assessment should be recorded for all pupils showing whether the pupils have met, exceeded or not achieved the learning objectives.

Teachers will use assessments to form a judgement as to whether each child has reached the targets for each key question in their year group. Evidence of work will be highlighted in children’s books, on photographs, videos and notes on discussions with children etc. This will demonstrate achievement of objectives.

 

Monitoring and review

Monitoring will support the self-evaluation process identifying areas of strength as well as those for development. The RE Lead is responsible for the monitoring of this policy. Areas for development will be incorporated into the School Improvement Plan as necessary.

Through monitoring the coordinator will:

• Ensure that there is clear progression throughout the school

• Analyse assessment data and pupil progress

• Identify any training needs and offer extra support and guidance to staff when it is appropriate

• Ensure that there are suitable resources to help with the teaching and learning of RE

 

Withdrawal from RE Learning

Parents may request that their child is withdrawn from R.E. Where parents are wishing to exercise this right, the Governing Body would first suggest that the parents first meet with the Headteacher to discuss their concerns. If the matter cannot be resolved, parents need to apply to the Governing Body in writing to withdraw their child from RE lessons. The Governing body will make arrangements with the Headteacher for the child(ren) to be supervised or engaged in another activity during this time. We are mindful that everyone holds different beliefs and this is taken into consideration at Eastling Primary School and in RE lessons.

 

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